Equestrian

The Practice offers a range of services to the private and commercial equestrian community, including initial advice, business plans, appraisals and handling of applications and appeals. We have obtained a number of planning permissions for equestrian development, from small stables to major polo developments.

Commercial Stables

  • Equestrian development including temporary stationing of a mobile home for an equestrian worker
  • Countryside Location

Eight Acres is a parcel of land containing an existing stable block and poor quality outbuildings in a rural isolation, within the wider setting of a Grade II* listed building. It is currently used for the grazing and keeping of horses.

The existing stables and outbuildings will be demolished to make way for new equestrian facilities and a change of use to commercial. The development consists of the following:

  • Stable building
  • Hay barn
  • Horse walker
  • Mobile home

The Council’s Conservation and Landscape Officers took great interest and meetings were held with them to finalise a satisfactory design to meet the client’s needs and the Council’s requirements.

Planning permission was granted in June 2011.

Key Issues:

  • Countryside location
  • Intensification of use
  • Impact on trees
  • Justifying commercial use in a rural location
  • Justification for temporary mobile home
  • Setting of a Grade II* listed building

Design Solution:

Working with the other consultants, our Architectural Technician and the Council’s Officers, a solution in terms of layout, design and amount was agreed and it was possible to provide a sustainable development that retained the setting of the Grade II* listed building with minimal impact on the countryside character of the area. As a result the proposal would be set back from the road and all equestrian facilities grouped together to improve visual impact and functional requirements.

commercial stable projectElevations & plans

Other Partners:

Equestrian Consultant – Rebecca Wilson, Equine Consultancy Group
Ecology – ENIMS
Trees – PBA Consulting

Equestrian Buildings

Project – Broxmore Equestrian

Planning permission was sought for an equestrian facility including stable building, horse walker, fencing and parking area for personal use. The applicant owns a number of different types of horses/ponies. The nature of the use of the horses for showing, show jumping, dressage and scurry driving requires them to be exercised on a regular basis for the health and well-being of the horses and the safety of the riders.

The application went to committee with an officer recommendation; however, the Planning Committee disagreed with its officers and refused permission.

Following a hearing, planning permission was granted on appeal.

 

 Broxmore 1

Proposed 3D view

 

Key Issues –

  • Effect on the character and appearance of the area
  • Impact on Special Landscape Area
  • Appropriate development in the countryside

It was successfully argued at the appeal that the development is not prominent in the landscape as the siting of the buildings takes advantage of established screening. The character of the buildings and facilities whilst typical of their genre are far better quality than ad hoc stabling to be found in the countryside. The proposals do not cause significant adverse harm to the landscape character of the area.

An Appeal Inspector agreed that none of the proposed elements were “excessive” and “would not be unusually large for a recreational stables of this type” and that overall “development would be sympathetic to the setting in terms of its scale and siting, and would not be likely to have any significant adverse impact on the landscape”. The application for an award of costs was also granted.

 

Planning consultants: Ian Ellis and Alexandra Webb

Drawings by: Unsted Designs

For more information contact Ian Ellis, Director

Project – Greenacres Farm

Planning permission for the erection of a stable building and change of use of land to mixed agricultural and equestrian was successfully granted at Greenacres Farm, Wiltshire.

The site was within an AONB and replaced numerous dilapidated agricultural outbuildings and was significantly less (65% less) than the combined total of the former farm buildings.

The building and change of use of the land was necessary as no other building or land was available for the intended purpose.

Greenacres 1

 Proposed Floor Plans

Key Issues –

  • AONB location
  • Ecological impacts
  • Scale and nature of use
  • Diversification

The case was put forward that the building would be sited close to the existing dwelling and hay barns, thus forming an attractive group of buildings which related to one another in functional and visual terms.

It would not impact on the landscape quality of the AONB and will not generate any further traffic. The stable building was not prominent in the landscape and took advantage of the established screening. The size and massing was designed to fit within the context of the landscape

The mixed agricultural and equestrian use of the land would contribute to its long term maintenance and protection.

The principle of the change of use and the structure in this countryside location was considered acceptable.

 

Plans: The Stable Company (York) Limited

 

For more information contact Alexandra Webb, Planner

Project – Stapleford Farm

 Planning permission for the erection of an equestrian building for a hydrotherapy pool was successfully granted in the Winchester District.

The site is within the countryside and the application was for a sizeable building which was necessary as no other building or land was available for the intended purpose.

The hydrotherapy facility would be available to private customers as well as for the benefit of the applicant’s own horses.

 

 Stapleford Farm 1  Stapleford Farm 2

Proposed Plans                                                             Example Hydrotherapy Pool

Key Issues –

  • Countryside location
  • Highway impacts
  • Visual Impact
  • Scale and nature of use

The case was put forward that the building would be sited close to the existing equestrian buildings, thus forming an attractive group of buildings which related to one another in functional and visual terms.

It would not generate an unacceptable level of traffic. The existing buildings were already visible in the landscape and therefore the proposal would not result in any greater impact. The size and massing was designed to fit within the context of the landscape and appear agricultural in nature.

 

The mixed agricultural and equestrian use of the land would contribute to its long term maintenance and protection.

The principle of equestrian in this countryside location was already established and the proposed building in the proposed location, similar to existing, was considered acceptable.

Plans: Steve McClelland, Southern Planning Practice

For more information contact Alexandra Webb, Planner

Project – Oakhanger Farm

Planning permission for the erection of new equestrian buildings including a stable building, hay store and horse walker was successfully granted at Oakhanger Farm in the East Hants district.

The proposed scheme replaced numerous unsympathetic outbuildings, improved the setting of the listed buildings and raised the overall quality of the built form. The proposal resulted in the grouping together of all the equestrian facilities.

 

 Oakhanger Farm 2  Oakhanger Farm 1

Proposed Floor Plans

Key Issues –

  • Countryside location
  • Proximity to listed buildings

The case was put forward that the property is already in use for equestrian purposes and the applicants would like to provide more modern equestrian facilities for both private and livery use. The proposal would improve permeability across the site.

The landscape quality of the area would be respected and the improved facilities would not generate any further traffic. The proposed buildings were not prominent in the landscape and took advantage of the established screening. The size and massing was designed to fit within the context of the site and improve the setting of the listed buildings

The principle of the replacement equestrian buildings and new equestrian facilities was considered acceptable.

 

Consultant: Ian Ellis

Plans: Oakley Stables

 

For more information contact Ian Ellis, Director or Alexandra Webb, Planner

Project – Equestrian Floodlights

  • Six lights surrounding a manége
  • Located within the South Downs National Park (SDNP)
  • Ancillary to rural recreational activities
  • Essential equestrian facility for livery yard

The proposal was for the retention of six lights surrounding a manége, at a restricted height during the winter months before 7.30pm. The lights were screened by the fencing and the hedges situated around the site and along the road frontage. The proposal was also to implement further landscaping.

equestrian builds 1

Key Issues:

  • Effect of the development on the character and appearance of this area of the SDNP
  • Impact on amenities of local residents
  • Livelihood of rural business

Design Solution:

The lights were considered to be in an elevated position in a National Park. The number, timing, light intensity, direction and angle of elevation of the Lamps were therefore restricted as part of the proposal in order to reduce impact on neighbouring amenities and the character of the SDNP. Several photographs at various times of the day were taken as evidence to support the proposal and an evening appeal site visit was requested.

The visual intrusion was considered acceptable by a Planning Inspector and “not materially different from that generated by various other sources of light emission within the general area”.

The Planning Inspector also concluded that “the minor negative impact which the development creates to the area in general and the National Park in particular is outweighed in the planning balance by the benefits to the rural enterprise in the form of the livery which it supports without any material conflict with the relevant policies of the development plan”.

equestrian builds 2

Equestrian Development

Project – Polo Stables, Barfold Farm, Haslemere

Over the last four years the Practice has been acting for Cortium Sports Limited in the establishment of a polo training centre at Barfold Farm. Following a series of planning permissions and appeal decisions we had reached the point where the missing piece of the jigsaw was stables for competition polo horses and a manege.

Initial attempts to provide stables were met with refusals of permission but eventually Council officers and external consultants accepted that there was a need and planning permission was recommended for two alternative schemes to provide a total of 40 loose boxes plus a manege. However the Planning Committee disagreed with its officers and refused permission.

Following a Public Inquiry planning permission was granted on appeal in January 2015 for the conversion of an existing barn to 18 loose boxes, 22 new build loose boxes and a mange.

Key Issues:

  • Green Belt and Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty location
  • Landscape and visual impact

It was successfully argued at the appeal that no material change of use of land in the Green Belt had taken place and the development was ‘appropriate’ facilities for outdoor sport and preserved the openness of the Green Belt. The appeal Inspector was satisfied that there would be no harm to the character and appearance of the AONB and the appeals were allowed.

Project – Great Trippetts Estate

The sport of Polo is very popular in the South East of England with centres at Cowdray Park, Midhurst and Guards Polo Club at Windsor. Whilst those are two of the best known competition venues, patrons of the sport have their own training facilities. This brings us up against significant landscape issues in the National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Clients have been steadily developing their own facilities over the years and the Practice has been instrumental in achieving permissions for the Marquis of Milford Haven at his Great Trippetts Estate.

We are currently working with another polo playing client in developing new private facilities at his estate in West Sussex. The projects we have been involved with to date include:

  • A polo manege – success after two planning appeals and two court hearings. The manege is primarily an exercise area but also allows practice for arena and snow polo.
  • Two new exercise tracks – one was around the manege previously referred to and the other was a new track for exercising polo ponies.A new stable yard comprising a further 44 loose boxes, tack rooms, tractor shed, automatic horse walker and bronco building.
  • New and improved estate roads and equine tracks to assist the movement of vehicles within the estate and keep them off the public highway and to provide dedicated tracks for moving polo ponies.
Great Trippetts 5 Great Trippetts 6

Estate Roads And Equine Tracks

  • New extension to an existing office/workshop/store building crucial to the efficient running of the large and complex estate.
Great Trippetts 7 Great Trippetts 8

Existing Office/Workshop/Store Building

 

We have also been involved in smaller, more domestic issues on the Estate, particularly in relation to Great Trippetts Farmhouse:

  • Change of use of land to residential garden – the land (originally a paddock) is located to the west of the original garden of the Farmhouse. The change of use was initially refused and then allowed at appeal.
  • Retention of tennis court with surrounding chain link fencing and the formation of a small pond in connection with the creation of a glade and seasonal wetland area – approved under delegated powers.

Key Issues –

  • Impact on South Downs National Park
  • Landscape and visual impact
  • Impact on Amenity
  • Viability of rural enterprise

The various recreational uses at Great Trippetts have been long established and the proposed improvements to the viability of the rural enterprise are supported by national policy and it was considered that there was no conflict with National Park or local planning authority policies.

The proposed changes of use and new development did not set a precedent for similar changes of use or development due to the unique location of the proposals and the specialist recreational uses that take place across the estate.

A team of specialist landscape and legal consultants have been involved with proposals across the estate including:

Robinson Frances –  Beachcroft LLP

Mike Ibbotson – Colvin and Mogridge

For more information contact Ian Ellis, Direct

Private Stables

Project – Stable Block

  • Replacement building
  • Equestrian development
  • Countryside location

Land off Hatchley Lane is a parcel of land in the countryside containing an existing mobile stable block and a manege. The site is currently used for the grazing and keeping of horses for personal use.

The existing mobile stables would be demolished to make way for a new permanent stable block. The development consists of the following:

  • 6 x Looseboxes
  • Hay Storage
  • Tack/Feed Storage

A public right of way is located across the site and a number of oak trees are positioned along the northern boundary. The site is also in close proximity to a former in-filled pit and a large land fill site.

Planning permission was granted in October 2010.

 Key Issues:

  • Countryside location
  • Impact on trees
  • Ground gas contamination

Design Solution:

Working with the Council’s Environmental Protection department suitable mitigation measures were incorporated into the design and materials of the proposed stable block. Tree protection measures were also proposed in order to reduce impact. The principle of such equestrian development was acceptable and established by the previous mobile structures. The relocation of the stables further north improve the situation with the existing footpath as it will no longer be located between 2 sets of mobile stables.

Stable drawing plan

Other partners
Trees – Alderwood Consulting Ltd
For more information contact Alexandra King, Planner

 

Project – Stable Building with Ancillary Storage

  • Replacement building
  • Equestrian development
  • Countryside location

Land to the rear of Rose Cottage is a parcel of land in the countryside containing an existing stable block tractor store. The site is currently used for the grazing and keeping of horses for personal use.

The existing building is of a poor condition and would be demolished to make way for a new stable building with ancillary storage. The development consists of the following:

  • 5 x Looseboxes
  • Hay Storage
  • Tractor Store

A public right of way is located to the south of the site. The proposed replacement building is slightly higher than the previous however it would have a smaller footprint. The number of looseboxes would reduce from 5 to 4.

Planning permission was granted in July 2011.

Key Issues:

  • Countryside location
  • Within the South Downs National Park
  • Views from public footpath

Design Solution:

The principle of such equestrian development was acceptable and established by the existing structure and the neighbouring equestrian buildings. The increase in ridge height allows for usable roof space and a more efficient use of land. Views of the existing site are limited due to the existing planting and this would be maintained. Use of materials and design ensures proposal would not impact on the landscape character of the South Downs National Park.

Stable drawing plan